Enshrining Dia de los Muertos

For+the+first+time+in+the+event%E2%80%99s+history%2C+students+in+intricate+costumes+and+artfully+paint-%0Aed+faces+participated+in+Mescalito%2C+an+energetic+Wahakan-style+dance+that+originated+in%0A%0AOaxaca%2C+Mexico%2C+to+Spanish+songs+by+popular+Mexican+singer+Lila+Downs.
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Enshrining Dia de los Muertos

For the first time in the event’s history, students in intricate costumes and artfully paint-
ed faces participated in Mescalito, an energetic Wahakan-style dance that originated in

Oaxaca, Mexico, to Spanish songs by popular Mexican singer Lila Downs.

For the first time in the event’s history, students in intricate costumes and artfully paint- ed faces participated in Mescalito, an energetic Wahakan-style dance that originated in Oaxaca, Mexico, to Spanish songs by popular Mexican singer Lila Downs.

Rachel Kavalakatt

For the first time in the event’s history, students in intricate costumes and artfully paint- ed faces participated in Mescalito, an energetic Wahakan-style dance that originated in Oaxaca, Mexico, to Spanish songs by popular Mexican singer Lila Downs.

Rachel Kavalakatt

Rachel Kavalakatt

For the first time in the event’s history, students in intricate costumes and artfully paint- ed faces participated in Mescalito, an energetic Wahakan-style dance that originated in Oaxaca, Mexico, to Spanish songs by popular Mexican singer Lila Downs.

Rachel Kavalakatt, Staff Writer

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Irvington’s MEChA held its biannual Dia De Los Muertos celebration, where students in all Spanish classes came together to learn about and celebrate the Day of the Dead on its last day. A popular traditional celebration in Latin America, Dia De Los Muertos is a three-day celebration from Oct. 31 to Nov. 2, during which people honor their lost loved ones.

Extensively decorated altars, featuring traditional elements of the Latin American celebration such as incense, candles, painted skulls, and colorful flowers, were put on display in the Cafeteria. The altars also showcased meaningful, traditional items such as Pan de Muerto (bread for the dead), pictures of the deceased to pay respect to their life, and glasses of water that are thought to quench the thirst of the dead. On various levels of the altar, offerings or gifts are displayed: usually the deceased’s favorite items that serve to commemorate their life and welcome them back home.

“We did a really good job this year to make sure the altars have all the necessary components, and the things that they need, like a glass of water, Cempasúchitl, or Mexican marigolds, all that kind of stuff.I’m really proud of this year and the event we have put together,” said Itzel Lara (12), coordinator and choreographer of Dia De Los Muertos.

The cafeteria was draped in multicolor banners that spanned the length of the room, adding to the event’s vibrant and joyous aura while retaining the authenticity of the Mexican celebration. All spanish classes attended the event, including students, staff, and parents.  

The celebration truly captured the essence of Latin culture at Irvington, a small yet vibrant flavor of on-campus diversity. The event was a chance for other students to familiarize themselves with the rich customs and traditions that they only read about in their Spanish classes, and to immerse themselves in the food, fun, and festivities of the Day of the Dead.

For the first time in the event’s history, students in intricate costumes and artfully painted faces participated in Mescalito, an energetic Oaxacan-style dance that originated in Oaxaca, Mexico, to Spanish songs by popular Mexican singer Lila Downs. The dancers entertained audiences throughout the day, and even teachers including Mr. Ballado and Mr. Gomez joined in on the fun.

“Dia De Los Muertos is truly a gorgeous celebration of the living, because we are actually celebrating the dead, and how that helps us live, and it’s about living life and celebrating it, and accepting death, as part of life,” said Lara.